JOURNAL OF NATURAL RESOURCES ›› 2017, Vol. 32 ›› Issue (5): 841-853.doi: 10.11849/zrzyxb.20160549

• Resource Evaluation • Previous Articles     Next Articles

The Impact of Industrial Relevancy on Regional Carbon Emission: Empirical Analysis Based on the Input-output Data of EU Countries

YUAN Yuan1, XI Qiang-min2, LI Guo-ping3   

  1. 1. School of Humanities, Economics and Laws, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China;
    2. School of Economics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China;
    3. School of Government, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
  • Received:2016-05-30 Revised:2016-08-31 Online:2017-05-20 Published:2017-05-20
  • Supported by:
    National Natural Science Foundation of China, No.41601117; National Basic Research Program of China, No.2012CB955802; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, No.3102016RW008

Abstract: Carbon emission is the inevitable result of development. With the changes of extensive development to intensive development, is there a peak of carbon emission? And if the peak does exist, when it would appear? The answers of above questions are directly related to the distribution principle and equity of global carbon quotas. The industrial correlation, which is the inherent driving force of the upgrade of economic structure, can demonstrate the stage of regional economic development. This paper utilized theoretical and empirical analysis and concluded that the pattern of carbon emission is an inverted-U shape (Carbon Emission Baseline, CEB). The empirical study of this paper shows: the 1% increase in correlation between high-end manufacturing sector and productive service sector and between high-end manufacturing sector and distributive service sector will cause 3.63% and 5.57% decrease of regional carbon emission, respectively; the 1% increase of correlation between middle-end manufacturing sector and productive service sector and between middle-end manufacturing sector and distributive service sector will result in 7.05% decline and 0.57% growth of regional carbon dioxide emission, respectively; the 1% increase of correlation degree between low-end manufacturing sector and distributive services sector and between low-end manufacturing sector and distributive service sector will bring 4.55% and 10.43% increase in regional carbon emissions, respectively. Therefore, in the initial stage of economic development, the high association between low-end manufacturing and services sectors would have positive effect on carbon emissions; when it came to the period of industrialization, although the dominant industries were slightly different, the overall carbon emissions increased significantly; when economic development entered the mature stage, the high-end manufacturing associations would continue exerting negative effect on carbon emissions, and the regional carbon emissions would demonstrate decline trend. This pattern suggests that if a region is still in the stage of low-end manufacturing and services, this region has rights to keep emission increasing to sustain the basic development. Therefore, CEB not only gives a shape of emission, but also provides a standard relationship between the evolution of emission and economic development. On this level, CEB has potential to be a complement principle of global carbon apportion.

Key words: correlation of industries, European Union countries, carbon emission

CLC Number: 

  • F205